• Pyramid scams thriving in SA - Personal Finance News

    Pyramid schemes in South Africa are more likely to collapse than be shut down, thanks to regulatory arbitrage. The National Consumer Commission (NCC) this week said it was no longer pursuing an investigation into nine suspected pyramid schemes. It said the police’s Specialised Commercial Crimes Unit has taken over the matter. The NCC was established in terms of the Consumer Protection Act (CPA), which defines and outlaws pyramid schemes. However, the commission doesn’t have the capacity to do forensic investigations, Trevor Hattingh, NCC spokesman, says. And only legitimate businesses can be taken to the National Consumer Tribunal, he says. Hattingh was responding to questions about reports this

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  • Malema unapproachable, only listens to Shivambu says disgruntled EFF member

     "Julius is a liar," said Economic Freedom Fighters member Lufuno Gogoro. "He is lying that we can sit down with him. Julius doesn't want to listen to anyone except [EFF chief whip] Floyd [Shivambu] and we cannot run an organisation through friendship." Gogoro is among a group of EFF members, calling itself defenders of the EFF constitution, which had planned to approach the High Court in Johannesburg on Friday for an urgent interdict against Malema and the EFF's leadership. It wanted a stop put to the party's provincial conferences and its national people's assembly, which is expected to be held in December. Earlier on Friday, Malema told reporters in Johannesburg that disgruntled members were

    Times LIVE q
  • ‘I had to step down,’ says Nene

    FORMER Finance Minister Nhlanhla Nene is keeping busy by tending his garden. Mr Nene was fired by President Jacob Zuma in December and replaced by little known MP Des Van Rooyen, prompting an unprecedented backlash from the markets and a knock to the currency. Former finance minister Pravin Gordhan was then assigned the post in a bid to contain the fallout. Mr Nene had resigned as an MP after his axing in December and was said to be earmarked for nomination for a post at the African Regional Centre of the New Development Bank. However, he told the Financial Mail this week that he has not yet received a formal offer for the post months after the decision to nominate him was taken by Mr Zuma. He

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  • Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it's the Guptas

    Watch: We will not sell SA to the Guptas over a curry - Malema's top five #Zupta quotes The man on fire, controversial and entertaining, EFF leader Julius Malema cooked up some of his best rhetoric while addressing the media on Thursday. Watch the top 5 quotes from Malema’s press briefing on Jacob Zuma, Nkandla and the Guptas.   The Big Read: Who's running this country? by Justice Malala Who appoints our cabinet ministers? If it is President Jacob Zuma, with whom does he appoint them? With the ANC deployment committee? With the ANC's top-five leaders? Or does he do it with his benefactors, the Gupta family? If he does do it with the Guptas, as seems clear from his last two cabinet appointments,

    Times LIVE q
  • The science behind why so many women want to befriend gay men

    But with society’s attitudes toward gays and lesbians changing, it’s become all the more important to build a holistic understanding of the relationships between gay and straight people. As a researcher in social psychology, I’ve often wondered: why dostraight female-gay male relationships work so well? Why are straight women so drawn to having gay men as friends? And when do these relationships typically form?   During the course of my research, I’ve discovered that the most interesting, compelling – and, arguably, most theoretically coherent – explanation is through the lens of evolution. Specifically, I believe evolutionary psychology and human mating can help explain why relationships between

    Sunday Times q
  • Sensational return for Special One?

    London - Jose Mourinho is on the brink of getting the job of his dreams by becoming Manchester United manager this summer. In a dramatic twist for Manchester football, it means he would resume his toxic rivalry with Pep Guardiola, who was announced last Monday as City’s new boss for next season. No deal has been signed but talks have opened and Mourinho has his heart set on the job. United see him as the one man who can go head to head with Guardiola when trying to lure new talent to the club. City already wish to land Paul Pogba from Juventus and John Stones from Everton. United hope the arrival of Mourinho, who calls himself the Special One, will give them the chance to compete. The Portuguese

    Independent Online q
  • Controversial umpire calls halt Proteas

    Two controversial umpiring decisions halted the Proteas’ progress on Saturday as they ended on 262/7 in the second one-day international against England in Port Elizaeth. Proteas captain AB de Villiers won the toss and elected to bat first at St George’s Park on a sunny day, but the pitch was a bit slow and didn’t allow the ball to come on to the bat. Duminy had taken his time to get in on a difficult track alongside De Villiers, but the middle-order duo stuck it out to put on a 107-run partnership for the fourth wicket. Just as they got going after De Villiers reached his 48th ODI half-century, the Proteas were rocked by the double blow of losing their captain and then Duminy within three balls.

    Independent Online q
  • Nigeria: Breaking

    Copyright © 2016 Daily Trust. All rights reserved. Distributed by AllAfrica Global Media (allAfrica.com). To contact the copyright holder directly for corrections — or for permission to republish or make other authorized use of this material, click here. AllAfrica publishes around 1,400 reports a day from more than 140 news organizations and over 500 other institutions and individuals, representing a diversity of positions on every topic. We publish news and views ranging from vigorous opponents of governments to government publications and spokespersons. Publishers named above each report are responsible for their own content, which AllAfrica does not have the legal right to edit or correct.

    AllAfrica.com q
  • Home Affairs hopes to further ease visa requirements

    Official said the department has given itself a year to introduce further measures to ease travel to SA. Home Affairs Child visa regulations Home Affairs Department Stricter visa regulations South Africa visa regulations SA Tourism Services Association Satsa SATSA PRETORIA – The Home Affairs department said it hopes to further ease visa requirements to facilitate travel into South Africa within the next year.  The department met with the Southern African Tourism Services Association (Satsa) in Pretoria yesterday. The association, which has been highly critical of the department because of restrictive regulations, has welcomed measures already put in place.  Director General Mkuseli Apleni said

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  • Puzzle of missing mom deepens - Independent on Saturday

    Durban - The mystery over the whereabouts of a British woman, Linda Rowe, 63, believed to have last been in Pietermaritzburg, deepened on Friday when Rowe purportedly contacted the police and SA Community Crime Watch. Last night, Mike Venter from the crime-watch group confirmed he had received an e-mail from a person claiming to be the missing Linda Rowe late on Thursday night. “I asked her to contact the investigating officer, who said a woman had phoned him on Friday morning. The officer asked her to come into the police station to sign an affidavit confirming her identification. But there has been no sign of her as yet,” said Venter. Rowe’s daughter, Kirsty Pockson, who was in South Africa

    Independent Online q
  • The biggest losers in the Nkandla saga

    Police Minister Nathi Nhleko has come out as the biggest loser in the Nkandla debacle. Former ANC chief whip Mathole Motshekga and Public Works Minister Thulas Nxesi also have egg on their faces due to the saga. The three led the pack in arguing that President Jacob Zuma should not pay for the upgrades at Nkandla. But Zuma's proposal to pay has left his defenders in a corner. While the ANC and Cosatu welcomed Zuma's announcement to pay back some money spent on non-security upgrades at his private home, opposition parties still want him to appear before court. Cosatu said in a statement Zuma's proposal would bring an end to the drawn-out controversy regarding the public protector's report on Nkandla.

    Sowetan LIVE q
  • Mbeki was cool, formal and stiff but not aloof: Mboweni

    "Many of the meanings of 'aloof'... do not describe him. Cool, yes, forbidding, maybe, formal, yes, stiff, perhaps, reserved, yes. The rest NO!!” he said in a post on his Facebook page. He said he had known Mbeki for many years. On Monday, Mbeki published the fourth in his series of letters. The latest one was entitled "Dare you ponder the obvious: of course Mbeki is aloof". Mboweni provided a variety of definitions of the word: "Not friendly or forthcoming, cool and distant. Distant, detached, unresponsive, remote, unapproachable, forbidding, stand-offish, formal, impersonal, stiff, austere, stuffy, withdrawn, reserved, unforthcoming, uncommunicative, indifferent." He said he did not agree with

    Times LIVE q
  • Chief expels family for joining IFP

    A family has apparently been banished from their village near Pietermaritzburg in KwaZulu-Natal after they joined a political party opposed by the local chief. The Bhengu family said they were shocked when they were expelled from Maqongqo, a place they have called home for more than 50 years. They were banished on Wednesday and were given until today to move out of the area. They said they had nowhere to go. The banishment came after some of the 11 family members publicly joined the Inkatha Freedom Party (IFP) in September last year. After that, they said, their father Bhekumuzi Bhengu was never allowed to speak or address traditional gatherings with the chief and his kinsmen again. On Wednesday,

    Sowetan LIVE q
  • Syrian family’s asylum bid turned down - Western Cape

    Cape Town - A family of Syrian refugees in Cape Town have been left shocked and stunned by a Home Affairs official who dismissed their asylum application as “unfounded”, declaring their home country “stable” and rejecting claims they feared for their lives if they returned to the war-torn country.  Humanitarian aid was, therefore, not warranted, the department’s finding said. The decision, taken last year at a time when newspapers were full of reports about the war in Syria, including in the family’s home city of Damascus, has now led to the family seeking urgent intervention as their temporary asylum seeker permits expire in less than three weeks. Following last year’s finding by the refugee

    Independent Online q
  • Africa: Khoisan Show That 'Race' Has No Place in Human Ancestry

    The ancient origins, anatomical, linguistic and genetic distinctiveness of southern African San and Khoikhoi people are matters of confusion and debate. They are variously described as the world's first or oldest people; Africa's first or oldest people, or the first people of South Africa. They are in fact two evolutionarily related but culturally distinct groups of populations that have occupied southern Africa for up to 140,000 years. Their first-people status is due to the fact that they commonly retain genetic elements of the most ancient Homo sapiens. This conclusion is based on evidence from specific types of DNA. This evidence also demonstrates that other sub-Saharan human populations

    AllAfrica.com q
  • South Africa: Govt to Amend Travel Rules

    Parents can breathe a sigh of relief after the Department of Home Affairs announced on Thursday it is amending its controversial rule that makes it a requirement for parents to have their minor children's unabridged birth certificates available before they can travel. Mkuseli Apleni, the department's director general, said the regulations were being reviewed and amended. The amended law would stipulate that parents' details would be printed in the minor's passport, meaning they would not have to carry birth certificates. "Home affairs is working jointly with the national department of tourism to ensure the regulations are amended accordingly," he said. The tourism department had previously argued

    AllAfrica.com q
  • Zuma drags ANC 'into a dark hole'

    Yesterday ANC members spoke openly of being ''embarrassed'' and ''pained'' by the president after he was forced into a second dramatic climbdown in two months - this time over Nkandla. Two years after denying liability for the splurging of millions in taxpayers' money on his private KwaZulu-Natal homestead, Zuma announced late on Tuesday that he had written to the Constitutional Court proposing to repay some of the money in line with the recommendations of Public Protector Thuli Madonsela. The U-turn came just days before the court was due to decide whether he should foot a portion of the bill for supposed security upgrades, including a swimming pool described as a fire-fighting facility, a chicken run and a cattle kraal, which Madonsela found were undue benefits. It followed years of political fallout during which an ANC-dominated parliamentary committee and the police minister controversially absolved Zuma of liability.

    Times LIVE q
  • It was proper for me to resign

    Former finance minister Nhlanhla Nene said, on Saturday, he felt it was “proper” for him to resign as an ANC MP. This following his name being put forward to head the African Regional Centre of the New Development Bank/Brics bank. “Yes, I resigned last year,” he confirmed. “In line with my removal [and being nominated for the Brics bank position] I felt it would be the proper thing to do.” While he resigned in December, his resignation was processed only last month. After Nene’s sacking as finance minister, President Jacob Zuma said the "urgency of the changes in the leadership of the National Treasury" was because nominations needed to be sent to Shanghai in terms of the head of the African

    Sowetan LIVE q
  • All 79 miners trapped underground rescued

    Relief efforts continued well into the night for three remaining miners who were still unaccounted for. Mosebenzi Zwane Lily Mine Lily Mine collapse Mine collapse JOHANNESBURG – All 79 miners trapped underground after a collapse at the Lily Gold Mine in Baberton have been rescued.  Relief efforts continued well into the night for three remaining miners who were still unaccounted for, after a building at the entrance of a shaft caved in yesterday morning.  In a meeting with mine managers, Mineral Resources Minister, Mosebenzi Zwane urged bosses to do everything possible to mitigate any harm while miners are underground.  His spokesperson Martin Madlala said, “Minister Zwane takes matters of health

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  • Apple accepting broken iPhone trade-ins

    Dig out your run-down iPhone handsets with broken screens, cameras and buttons are now part of the Apple Store’s Reuse and Recycle program. The Cupertino tech giant had previously insisted on used iPhones being in good condition before accepting them against the cost of a new piece of kit; fully operational handsets would net returning customers up to $350 USD in credit. In a widening of Apple Store policy, damaged phones are now included in the scheme, with rates of up to $50 for an iPhone 5s, $200 for an iPhone 6, and $250 for an iPhone 6 Plus, Apple said February 5, verifying an early report from 9to5Mac. Selected stores will also begin to offer an official screen protector application service.

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